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Great news for all you Provence lovers out there – our new Cezanne tablecloths are in store!

Some of you may be wondering: Cezanne? And what is this Cezanne? Does she perhaps mean Sesame? As in “Open Sesame”? Or Sesame Street?

 

Now before you get too excited let me set the record straight: that is not the Cezanne I am talking about. Allow me to explain.

Transport yourself, if you will, to 1870s France. A little coffee shop in Paris, the hollow sound of horses’ hooves hitting the slightly damp stone of the street, a Cezanne painting hanging in the Salon des Refusés… Or if you are anything like the artist himself maybe you would rather be somewhere else; somewhere more to the south and a little to the East, say, in Marseille or L’Estaque, in 1870s Provincial France. That is where Paul Cezanne, having left Paris and his growing success there behind, emerged from his ‘Dark period’ and focused on capturing the landscapes of his beloved Provence.

His impressionist paintings give us a glimpse of the time following the Franco-Prussian war. It seems not even this period of tumult and conflict could destroy the magic of slowly melting snow, signifying the coming of Autumn and warmer, brighter days ahead.

Come, let us marvel awhile at the perfect harmonization of colour, the perfectly green fields and the adorable houses that formed Cezanne’s view in 1872 and 1873 as he painted La Maison du Pendu, The Hanged Man’s House. For years he worked, placing stroke after stroke on the canvas, to bring this wonder before our eyes and make us drool at the beauty of the past. Whatever occurrence inspired the title, there is nothing that could pull us away from our perfect Provincial fantasy at this point.

Unfortunately for us art lovers, Cezanne’s oeuvres are likely to be slightly out of our price range, not to mention inaccessible since they are resting in Museums all over the world, making it impossible for us to admire them outside our computer screens.

Our Cezanne-inspired tablecloths are a nice, accessible, moderately priced compromise to the real thing if you still wish to bring a taste of France’s South to your home. Plus, you can eat off them, which you can’t do with an original gazillion dollar canvas.